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  • Paintball Clothing - What To Wear

    We often talk about what equipment you should purchase, but what you wear is just as important. Newbies are often left wondering what they should wear or purchase if they are serious about pursuing Paintball as a hobby.

    You should consider the characteristics of paintball, you’ll be playing in all weather, from snow and sunshine to rain. Rule of thumb is always dress in layers that you can adjust weather according. Ultimately remember its paintball you’re going to get shot at, covering and protecting your skin is a must.

    Headwear

    Head wraps and hats are the difference between your mask fogging up or not. A good headband will soak up all sweat thus preventing the mask fogging. Headbands come in various designs but our recommendation would be the HK Army Headband which is a available in a great range of colours and designs so there's something for everyone.

    Check it out at http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/hk+army+headband

    Protection

    If you only get one item of protection it should be a good pair of knee pads. Other items like elbow pads, gloves, chest protectors are nice extras but knee pads can really prevent serious injury.

    Exalt Freeflex knee pads offer a good balance between offering protection whilst being comfortable and breathable at the same time.

    Check them out at http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/exalt-freeflex-knee-pads

    Or shop our full paintball protection section at https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/pads-protection

    Pants/Jerseys

    Paintball exposes your legs and arms to various elements, such as thorns, twigs, rocks etc, so obviously shorts and short sleeved tops are never ideal.

    We have a vast variety of jerseys and tactical wear, its mainly down to personal preference and what you ca afford. Check out our jersey selection at https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/apparel/paintball-clothing/paintball-jerseys

    Paintball designed pants will offer you  strategically placed stretch panels for maximum mobility as well as stretched knee panels and abrasion resistant knee pads. Again we have a varied range available so check them out at https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/apparel/paintball-clothing/paintball-pants-trousers

    Footwear

    You want to wear footwear that you don’t mind getting dirty but also offers you the necessary comfort and grip. We would suggest the DROM1.5 Cleats, these shoes are designed to adapt to every kind of playing surface, they are lightweight and comfortable, ideal when your constantly on the move.

    Check them out at http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/drom-1-5-paintball-cleats-3998

    If you have any questions or need any further advice don’t hesitate to contact us on  01642 605000.

  • Which Paintball Guns can use HPA & Co2

    We often talk separately about the two pressure sources of high pressure air (HPA) and Co2. It’s become increasingly more common for paintball players to ask for a paintball gun that can use both propellants as opposed to just one.

    Today we’re going to address the question of “What paintball guns can use both HPA (High pressure air) and Co2?”

    Co2 & HPA

    Having a paintball gun that can operate on both HPA and Co2 will allow you to play on any paintball field. Generally, most sites will only use one propellant or the other so if you’re looking to try various fields it’s a good option to have a gun that can work with both, this will give you more freedom.

    However having a gun that can run on both HPA and Co2, you will need to own both types of paintball tanks, and then you need to consider the running costs for both tanks and what they can hold;

    HPA Tanks;

    HPA air tanks hold air that is under pressure but isn’t compressed down to a liquid form. The fill is measured by pressure using PSI (pounds per square inch), larger tanks that hold a higher volume of air will allow you to shoot more due to the increased volume, even though they may fill to the same PSI as a smaller tank. Air is a more commonly used source of pressure on paintball sites.

    Dye Core air tank 4500psi:

    These are small and very light, and the stainless steel core means you don't get any of the issues that can are associated with composite core based tanks. We recommend a Ninja Regulator to go on it for performance and reliability

    Check them out;

    Dye Air System -  http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/dye-core-air-tank-1-1-litre-5085

    Ninja UI Reg - http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/ninja-ul-reg

    Co2 Tanks;

    Carbon dioxide tanks hold gas in CO2 liquid form. These come in various sizes such as 4oz, 12oz and 20oz (ounce). The tanks are designed to hold the ounces in weight as opposed to volume. It can be confusing but the measure that matters is the weight of the liquid. Your tank can be filled to the level your tank is rated for. Once upon a time Co2 was THE gas used for paintball, but these days more and more fields have converted over to using HPA because of the long term cost effectiveness, so CO2 isn't so common these days.

    Prefilled Co2 Tanks with Adaptor 

    This is ideal if you want to use your marker straight away. We would however only recommend these for low end markers.

    5 x 4oz - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/5-x-4oz-prefilled-co2-with-adapter

    If you more information on the two pressure sources check out our blog post “The difference between Co2 & HPA air tanks”.

    Magfed v Hopper Fed

    Next you need to consider whether you want to play Magfed or Hopper fed. Traditional paintball is played with paintball guns fed by hoppers – paintball hoppers can hold around 200 paintballs.

    Magfed is becoming increasingly popular, here paintball guns are magazine fed rather than hopper fed. Generally those choosing Magfed are more tactical players due to ammo being limited – most magazines can only hold up to 20 paintballs.

    The guns below can use both HPA and Co2, but to help you out we have separated the guns into Magfed and Hopper fed options.

    MagFed Paintball Guns

    Tippmann TMC - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tippmann-tmc-68 + Tippmann TMC magazine two pack https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tmc-magazine-2-pack

    Tippmann TiPX Pistol - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tipx-pistol-black

    Tippmann TCR - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tippmann-tcr

    Hopper Fed Paintball Guns

    Tippmann Gryphon - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/gryphon or check out our Tippmann Gryphon starter pack - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/gryphon-starter-pack-5322

    Tippmann Cronus / Cronus Tactical - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tippmann-cronus-tactical or check out our Tippmann Cronus Tactical starter pack - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/cronus-tactical-starter-pack

    Tippmann A5 - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tippmann-a5-response

    Tippmann Bravo One Elite - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/bravo-one-elite

    Tippmann Sierra One - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/sierra-one-black-5270 or check out our Tippmann Sierra One starter pack - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/sierra-one-tactical-starter-pack

    If you have questions don't hesitate to contact us on 01642 605000 or you can email us at info@bzpaintball.co.uk.

  • What's the best paintball gun for a beginner?

    best beginner paintball markers

    What’s a good paintball gun for a beginner?

    Throughout our years as a paintball retailer, we’ve had hundreds of people contact us that are starting out, and the number one questions they ask is “What’s a good paintball gun for a beginner?”

    There is no simple ‘one gun’ answer to this, as there are a number of factors to consider:

    Co2 or HPA (High Pressure Air)

    Where you’re going to be playing, do they use co2 or HPA? This can affect your options – i.e. some paintball guns will only work on HPA (mostly the electronic ones), so it would be pointless getting a gun that can only work on HPA if your local field only uses/supplies co2. Check out our blog post on CO2 and High Pressure Air tanks for more info.

    Magfed v Hopper Fed

    Traditionally, paintball is played with paintball guns fed by hoppers, however there is a new format of paintball which is becoming increasingly popular where the paintball guns are fed by magazines rather than hoppers. Magfed play tends to be more tactical as the ammo is a lot more limited, i.e. a hopper can hold around 200 paintballs at a time where as most magazines might only hold up to 20 paintballs.

    Tactical Style v Speedball Style

    This one is purely down to personal preference. The speedball style markers are generally easier to handle as they’re lighter and less bulky, but some players prefer their paintball guns to look as real as possible.

    Electronic v Mechanical

    Electronic guns have a higher rate of fire (bps/balls per second) than mechanical, and most may have a more consistent (accurate) shot compared to mechanical guns (there are exceptions to this rule!). However, electronic guns are generally more expensive to buy, require more maintenance and also require an electronic hopper to feed the paintballs quick enough. Also, your local paintball field might not allow electronic paintball guns so you should consider this too. Check out our Electronic vs Mechanical Markers blog post for more info.

    How often are you going to play?

    If you plan on taking up paintball as a hobby but only plan on playing once or twice a year, it might not make sense for you to drop a load of money on the latest and greatest paintball gun. Similarly, if you’re going to play frequently, you’re better off spending a little more on your gun to get something that you’re going to be happy with for longer. Quite often we see people come into the game, buy the cheapest kit they can find, only to get totally hooked and then end up spending money on a whole new set up in just a few months time because they find the basic gun they bought doesn’t quite cut it any longer.

    What is your budget?

    Up to a certain extent, you really do get what you pay for with a paintball gun. Generally, if you can afford something a little more expensive than the budget guns, they’re going to keep you happier for longer. However you should consider what else you might need to go with the gun to get the best out of it – you may need an electronic loader to feed it, or an air tank rather than co2 to power it.

    Stick to a recognised brand

    When buying any paintball gun, you want to buy with the confidence that if you do encounter any tech issues, you’re going to be able to get warranty, parts & support. Your best bet is to stick to recognised paintball brands, such as Tippmann, GOG, Proto, Planet Eclipse, DYE, Empire, Shocker Paintball and DLX. Check out our full range of paintball guns here.

    Here at BZ Paintball we stock various paintball markers that are ideal for novices, simple to use and easy to maintain. Check out our top beginner marker picks below and what to look out for.

    Mechanical Markers - Top Picks

    Low End Mechanical markers (£115-£140)

    Medium Range Mechanical markers; (£140-£200)

    Electronic Markers - Top Picks

    Low End Electronic markers (£240-£315)

    Medium Range Electronic markers (£500+)

    What happens if your paintball gun breaks?

    Unfortunately it’s the nature of the sport, and there is a chance you may have issues with your paintball gun. Sometimes it can simply be an issue with maintenance or a dead (or cheap) battery. In some cases you may be able to fix issues yourself, but if you do need help we have in house expert techs which will assist you.

    You can call us on 01642 605000 or email us on info@bzpaintball.co.uk and you can send in your gun to us and our tech team will price up the issues and go ahead with fixing your gun.

  • The First Piece Of Paintball Kit You Should Buy

    Now if your new to the game chances are you’ll assume your first purchase will be a marker, I mean that’s pretty essential to playing paintball right? Well despite your first assumption, you should always purchase your paintball mask/goggle first. It’s THE most important piece of kit you as a paintball player can own and here’s why…

    Protection

    A paintball mask is designed to protect your face including, ears, eyes, mouth and nose from incoming paintballs. Every moment you spend playing paintball you MUST wear your mask, more paintball injuries occur from the removal of masks than actually playing. This means you as the player need to spend extra time ensuring your mask is perfect for you.

    Fit

    We always recommend that players try on various masks to ensure a comfortable fit with suitable protection, after all no two faces are the same. Some of the crucial areas to check for fit are the eyes, ears and head, this will ensure all vital areas are covered.

    Ensure the strap of your mask is up at an angle as opposed to going straight across the back of your head, this will assist with the fit.

    Type

    Only paintball specific masks can be worn during games, these are designed and tested against the impact of paintballs. This isn’t something you should skimp on. It’s always wise to spend the extra money to buy a goggle that is equipped with a thermal anti fog lens, this will prevent your vision being impaired making game play more enjoyable. If you however want to purchase a single lens goggle here’s how to prevent fogging www.bzpaintball.co.uk/blog/prevent-your-mask-from-fogging/

     

  • Prevent Your Mask From Fogging

    A paintball mask is the most important piece of equipment you can own as a paintball player and should be the first bit of kit you invest in.

    The mask is designed to keep the players safe during games, they don’t just protect your eyes and face but forehead and ears too. This eliminates the chances of permanent damage such as blindness. Let’s face it some of them look pretty cool so its win win, protection and looking good.

    There’s nothing more frustrating than a fogged up mask that can limit visibility, plus it’s dangerous too. Players may be tempted to remove their mask so they are able to see, exposing them to the danger of being hit.

    Now there are ways and means to help prevent this, you may want to consider installing a thermal anti-fog lens (check to ensure this will fit your mask) or buy a mask with a thermal lens. Another option is installing a fan to assist with the circulation of air.

    Ensure the strap of your mask is up at an angle as opposed to going straight across the back of your head, this will assist with the fit.

    Masks;

    http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/empire-helix-thermal-goggle-3040 http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/jt-proflex-goggle-3812 http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/hk-army-klr-goggle-le-5119

    Lenses;

    http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tippmann-thermal-lens http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/empire-events-mirror-thermal-lens http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/vforce-armour-thermal-lens-2729

    Fan; http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/virtue-stealth-visor-fan-3554

    Some less effective solutions include coatings and anti-fog sprays, these should only be used after confirming they will not damage the integrity of the lens. Ensure ventilation holes on the google lens frames are not covered by scarves, head wraps (which we always recommend to prevent sweat entering the top of the mask) or hats. This will in turn aid with the air flowing through the mask preventing fog.

    Another option is to try and breathe down into the mask ensuring the air flows through the ventilation holes at the bottom.

    Spray; http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/jt-anti-fog-spray-2oz

    If you have any issues don’t hesitate to contact us on 01642 605000.

  • First Time Paintball Marker Buyers

    So you’ve played paintball a few times now with rented equipment and you’ve decided now’s the time to buy your first marker. Now this is difficult with a vast amount of markers available on the market today.

    Now we always say the first bit of kit anyone should buy is a mask, so the rest comes second to that.

    Before you commit to a purchase ask yourself these simple questions.

    What type of paintball do you want to play?

    There are two main forms of paintball, “Speedball” and “Woodsball”. The basic distinction between the two is Woodsball is played in the woods, whereas Speedball is played with large inflatable bunkers or manmade objects.

    If your wanting your main focus to be scenario games (woodsball) you ideally want a gun that can be carried like a rifle, size doesn’t matter too much as long as it’s both durable and comfortable.

    With regards to speedball, you want to look for a gun that is compact and hugs closely to your body when needed and shoots rapid.

    Time

    It might seem obvious, but how much time do you intend on spending on playing?

    You can get a super basic set up that may cost around £114.00+ most sites you can rent out equipment for around £10.00 so you need to consider the ratio of time and money. Markers do age quickly, updated and new models are released regularly.

    CO2 vs HPA

    Another thing to bear in mind is the compatibility of either CO2 or HPA (high pressure air) for further details into the difference between the two check out www.bzpaintball.co.uk/blog/what-is-the-difference-between-co2-and-compressed-air-tanks. You want to ensure you buy a marker that is suitable for the field you wish to play at, there’s no point purchasing a marker that only runs on air when the field you play at only uses CO2.

    Do you want an electronic or mechanical marker?

    Electronic markers run on batteries and circuit boards, whilst mechanical requires no electricity. Mechanical markers are louder and often run slower but are reliable.

    Electronic markers are either electro mechanical or electro-pneumatic.

    Electro mechanical is a mechanical marker that runs off an electronic trigger frame which fires the marker.

    Electro-pneumatic markers are harder to fix and cost more however shoot more consistently. The marker shoots by activating a solenoid valve which allows air to pass through which consequently shoots the ball.

    Do you want a low-end or medium-range gun?

    Now if you want to commit to buying a marker its best to again take into account time, for the occasional player look at low end and regular players, medium range.

    Our guys here at BZ have given their picks and since this blog is aimed for beginners we have only looked at guns below £300. We have also taken into account both tactical play and speedball.

    Speedball (Regular Player- Medium Range)

    - The Proto Rize, created to perform but built with your budget in mind this high-powered marker provides you with tournament level firepower for a fraction of the cost.  For more information click here.

    - The Eclipse Etha. Eclipse, one of the only remaining British brands in paintballs aim has always been set high; to produce the very best paintball equipment possible. Unashamedly, their products to date have always been aimed at the higher-end of the paintball market. They are feature- laden and finished to the very highest standard. For more information click here.

    Speedball (Occasional Player, Low End)

    - The GOG eNMey, this marker offers tournament-proven spool-valve performance at an entry level price. Features include a hammer free pneumatic design, semi-automatic firing mode and multi-gas operation. More information click here.

    - The Tippmann Gryphon is reliable, lightweight, and compact in design that is perfect for the new player.  More information click here.

    Tactical (Occasional Player, Low End)

    - The Tippmann Cronus Basic, combines high performance with incredible durability in a milsim body. The Cronus features Tippmanns reliable in-line bolt system in a high-impact composite body with soft over molded rubber grips. More information click here.

    - The GOG G-1M, The G-1M brings the power of the eNMEy core to the tactical theatre. With its rugged good looks, and extended tactical platform the G-1M is at home in the deepest woods or the tightest tactical venues.  More information click here.

    Tactical (Regular Player- Medium Range)

    - The Tippmann A-5 is the most popular scenario marker ever produced.  The A-5 features a durable aluminum body, inline bolt system, front and rear sling mounts, low profile hopper and 8.5” high performance ported barrel. It is easy to upgrade to the three position E-grip selector switch kit, Response Trigger or the Flatline barrel, for more information click here.

    - The Tippmann X7, the X7 Phenom® Mechanical with FlexValve® Technology offers the combination of improved air efficiency, superior accuracy, and the flexibility of CO2 or compressed air usage. The new FlexValve operates below 300 PSI for improved air efficiency allowing you to get over 1,400 shots from a 68 cubic inch 4500 psi tank. Also, due to its Spool Valve design, recoil is virtually eliminated for improved accuracy.  For more information click here.

    If you’re planning on playing both Woodsball and Tournament paintball, we recommend going with a speedball style marker, ensure this is electronic so that you can still compete. Granted this style of marker won’t look ‘tactical’ in the woods but at the end of the day a good marker is a good maker, regardless of paintball style.

    What happens if your marker breaks?

    Unfortunately it’s the nature of the sport, paintball guns will break, its part and parcel.

    Its best before you choose your gun that you read the manufactures specifications to see whether your gun will need a professional to fix it or whether you can do it yourself.

    If you do have an issue’s with your gun we do have in house tech which will assist you, all you have to do is send in your gun to us at 38B Dukesway, Teesside Industrial Estate, Stockton-on-Tees, TS17 9LT, with a cover note and our tech team will price up the issues and go ahead with fixing your marker.

    Other equipment

    Before you literally go all guns blazing and spend all your money on a marker, you need to think about the other equipment you will need. You will need paintball clothing (jerseys and trousers), a hopper, a barrel cover, compressed air or HPA (dependant on the gun) and of course paintballs. We stock everything you need on our website www.bzpaintball.co.uk. By factoring in the cost of all the equipment needed, this will give you a good idea of the set up you can afford.

    Check out our custom package builder by visiting www.bzpaintball.co.uk/custom-package-builder.

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