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  • Which Paintball Guns can use HPA & Co2

    We often talk separately about the two pressure sources of high pressure air (HPA) and Co2. It’s become increasingly more common for paintball players to ask for a paintball gun that can use both propellants as opposed to just one.

    Today we’re going to address the question of “What paintball guns can use both HPA (High pressure air) and Co2?”

    Co2 & HPA

    Having a paintball gun that can operate on both HPA and Co2 will allow you to play on any paintball field. Generally, most sites will only use one propellant or the other so if you’re looking to try various fields it’s a good option to have a gun that can work with both, this will give you more freedom.

    However having a gun that can run on both HPA and Co2, you will need to own both types of paintball tanks, and then you need to consider the running costs for both tanks and what they can hold;

    HPA Tanks;

    HPA air tanks hold air that is under pressure but isn’t compressed down to a liquid form. The fill is measured by pressure using PSI (pounds per square inch), larger tanks that hold a higher volume of air will allow you to shoot more due to the increased volume, even though they may fill to the same PSI as a smaller tank. Air is a more commonly used source of pressure on paintball sites.

    Dye Core air tank 4500psi:

    These are small and very light, and the stainless steel core means you don't get any of the issues that can are associated with composite core based tanks. We recommend a Ninja Regulator to go on it for performance and reliability

    Check them out;

    Dye Air System -  http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/dye-core-air-tank-1-1-litre-5085

    Ninja UI Reg - http://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/ninja-ul-reg

    Co2 Tanks;

    Carbon dioxide tanks hold gas in CO2 liquid form. These come in various sizes such as 4oz, 12oz and 20oz (ounce). The tanks are designed to hold the ounces in weight as opposed to volume. It can be confusing but the measure that matters is the weight of the liquid. Your tank can be filled to the level your tank is rated for. Once upon a time Co2 was THE gas used for paintball, but these days more and more fields have converted over to using HPA because of the long term cost effectiveness, so CO2 isn't so common these days.

    Prefilled Co2 Tanks with Adaptor 

    This is ideal if you want to use your marker straight away. We would however only recommend these for low end markers.

    5 x 4oz - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/5-x-4oz-prefilled-co2-with-adapter

    If you more information on the two pressure sources check out our blog post “The difference between Co2 & HPA air tanks”.

    Magfed v Hopper Fed

    Next you need to consider whether you want to play Magfed or Hopper fed. Traditional paintball is played with paintball guns fed by hoppers – paintball hoppers can hold around 200 paintballs.

    Magfed is becoming increasingly popular, here paintball guns are magazine fed rather than hopper fed. Generally those choosing Magfed are more tactical players due to ammo being limited – most magazines can only hold up to 20 paintballs.

    The guns below can use both HPA and Co2, but to help you out we have separated the guns into Magfed and Hopper fed options.

    MagFed Paintball Guns

    Tippmann TMC - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tippmann-tmc-68 + Tippmann TMC magazine two pack https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tmc-magazine-2-pack

    Tippmann TiPX Pistol - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tipx-pistol-black

    Tippmann TCR - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tippmann-tcr

    Hopper Fed Paintball Guns

    Tippmann Gryphon - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/gryphon or check out our Tippmann Gryphon starter pack - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/gryphon-starter-pack-5322

    Tippmann Cronus / Cronus Tactical - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tippmann-cronus-tactical or check out our Tippmann Cronus Tactical starter pack - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/cronus-tactical-starter-pack

    Tippmann A5 - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/tippmann-a5-response

    Tippmann Bravo One Elite - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/bravo-one-elite

    Tippmann Sierra One - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/sierra-one-black-5270 or check out our Tippmann Sierra One starter pack - https://www.bzpaintball.co.uk/sierra-one-tactical-starter-pack

    If you have questions don't hesitate to contact us on 01642 605000 or you can email us at info@bzpaintball.co.uk.

  • What's the best paintball gun for a beginner?

    best beginner paintball markers

    What’s a good paintball gun for a beginner?

    Throughout our years as a paintball retailer, we’ve had hundreds of people contact us that are starting out, and the number one questions they ask is “What’s a good paintball gun for a beginner?”

    There is no simple ‘one gun’ answer to this, as there are a number of factors to consider:

    Co2 or HPA (High Pressure Air)

    Where you’re going to be playing, do they use co2 or HPA? This can affect your options – i.e. some paintball guns will only work on HPA (mostly the electronic ones), so it would be pointless getting a gun that can only work on HPA if your local field only uses/supplies co2. Check out our blog post on CO2 and High Pressure Air tanks for more info.

    Magfed v Hopper Fed

    Traditionally, paintball is played with paintball guns fed by hoppers, however there is a new format of paintball which is becoming increasingly popular where the paintball guns are fed by magazines rather than hoppers. Magfed play tends to be more tactical as the ammo is a lot more limited, i.e. a hopper can hold around 200 paintballs at a time where as most magazines might only hold up to 20 paintballs.

    Tactical Style v Speedball Style

    This one is purely down to personal preference. The speedball style markers are generally easier to handle as they’re lighter and less bulky, but some players prefer their paintball guns to look as real as possible.

    Electronic v Mechanical

    Electronic guns have a higher rate of fire (bps/balls per second) than mechanical, and most may have a more consistent (accurate) shot compared to mechanical guns (there are exceptions to this rule!). However, electronic guns are generally more expensive to buy, require more maintenance and also require an electronic hopper to feed the paintballs quick enough. Also, your local paintball field might not allow electronic paintball guns so you should consider this too. Check out our Electronic vs Mechanical Markers blog post for more info.

    How often are you going to play?

    If you plan on taking up paintball as a hobby but only plan on playing once or twice a year, it might not make sense for you to drop a load of money on the latest and greatest paintball gun. Similarly, if you’re going to play frequently, you’re better off spending a little more on your gun to get something that you’re going to be happy with for longer. Quite often we see people come into the game, buy the cheapest kit they can find, only to get totally hooked and then end up spending money on a whole new set up in just a few months time because they find the basic gun they bought doesn’t quite cut it any longer.

    What is your budget?

    Up to a certain extent, you really do get what you pay for with a paintball gun. Generally, if you can afford something a little more expensive than the budget guns, they’re going to keep you happier for longer. However you should consider what else you might need to go with the gun to get the best out of it – you may need an electronic loader to feed it, or an air tank rather than co2 to power it.

    Stick to a recognised brand

    When buying any paintball gun, you want to buy with the confidence that if you do encounter any tech issues, you’re going to be able to get warranty, parts & support. Your best bet is to stick to recognised paintball brands, such as Tippmann, GOG, Proto, Planet Eclipse, DYE, Empire, Shocker Paintball and DLX. Check out our full range of paintball guns here.

    Here at BZ Paintball we stock various paintball markers that are ideal for novices, simple to use and easy to maintain. Check out our top beginner marker picks below and what to look out for.

    Mechanical Markers - Top Picks

    Low End Mechanical markers (£115-£140)

    Medium Range Mechanical markers; (£140-£200)

    Electronic Markers - Top Picks

    Low End Electronic markers (£240-£315)

    Medium Range Electronic markers (£500+)

    What happens if your paintball gun breaks?

    Unfortunately it’s the nature of the sport, and there is a chance you may have issues with your paintball gun. Sometimes it can simply be an issue with maintenance or a dead (or cheap) battery. In some cases you may be able to fix issues yourself, but if you do need help we have in house expert techs which will assist you.

    You can call us on 01642 605000 or email us on info@bzpaintball.co.uk and you can send in your gun to us and our tech team will price up the issues and go ahead with fixing your gun.

  • Electronic vs Mechanical Markers

    Choosing a marker isn’t as straight forward as it seems. You will need to take into account whether you want an Electronic or Mechanical marker. They both shoot paintballs, but in distinctive ways, so what’s the difference?

    Well as always we're here to help.

     The Basics

    All markers are designed to shoot paintballs at high speeds using either Co2 (carbon dioxide) or HPA (high pressure air).

    When you shoot a marker there is a small bolt which pushes the ball into the paintball barrel thus sealing the ball. A valve then releases compressed gas which expands the barrel forcing the ball to shoot out.

    The major difference between electronic and mechanical is the way the gun advances the ball into the barrel, seals the barrel and releases the gas.

    Mechanical guns

    Mechanical guns are normally mechanically activated blowback guns. These will fire once the trigger is pulled this then releases a bolt with is forced forwards via a spring which pushes the paintball into the barrel, once in the barrel the bolt hits a pin allowing air to travel into the barrel. The bolt returns to its original position by the expansion caused by the air.

    Mechanical Markers

    There is a vast variety of mechanical guns available on the market, here’s what our guys recommend;

    Neil’s Picks
    John’s Picks
    Damo's Picks

    Advantages

    Mechanical markers are often cheaper than the alternative electronic markers. They are easy to set up and can often use either CO2 or HPA. They are easy to maintain and relatively simple to fix.

    Disadvantages

    Mechanical markers generally lack accuracy and speed unlike electronic markers. The amount of air that propels the paintball varies resulting in the speed of the paintball being inconsistent. They must be cocked before fire and typically require higher pressure, meaning fewer shots per tank.

    Electronic Guns

    Electronic guns or electro-pneumatic rely on battery power and a circuit board that then activates solenoids which causes the gun to fire. The trigger is linked to the circuit board which tells the gun to fire which activates the gun. These guns rely on regulators that take into account variable air pressures to ensure consistent firing.

    Electronic Markers

    Electronic markers come in various forms and have varied internal set ups with different bolts, valves and regulators. Here’s what some of the guys from our shop recommend;

     Neil & John’s picks
    Damo's Picks

    Advantages

    In comparison to mechanical, electronic markers are more accurate (in most cases), consistent and can fire faster. They can operate on a lower pressure meaning more shots per tank and are often lighter and smaller.

    Disadvantages

    These markers are more expensive. They can be difficult to disassemble and maintain for inexperienced players.  They generally require HPA rather than Co2, so make sure you have access to HPA before buying. Also, you will need batteries to run your electronic marker (typically 9V).

    It really is all down to personal preference, you should take into account being new to the game or whether your an avid paintball player. If you have any questions don’t hesitate to call us on 01642605000.

  • Paintball And The Law

    For years, paintball has been one of the most fun, exhilarating outdoor activities around. Popular for groups of friends, team building, stag nights and parties, the possibilities are endless.

    Continue reading

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